Fandeck of Features

Keep Your Word and You'll Keep Your Work

Jim Chaney Custom Painting and Remodeling is a growing company, but owner Jim Chaney assures us it won’t get too big for his watch.
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By Jerry Rabushka, Editor

Shurtape stars in a big project.

Stucco tapes among tools used to keep surfaces clean and damage-free

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By Shurtape

Pratt & Lambert stars in another big project.

“Pratt & Lambert premium paints are used on distinctive homes and historical buildings coast-to-coast. We are known as a distinguished color leader with a family of innovative products that is trusted by architects and interior designers”
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By Pratt and Lambert

We’re excited about our new web site, coming October 1st!

If you’ve been reading all our articles about keeping up to date with web technology and social media, you might be wondering: “why isn’t The Paint Contractor practicing what it preaches?” We finally took our own advice, and as of October 1st we invite you to take a look at our new website
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By Jerry Rabushka

Roof, floor, fire, and the coatings that got easier.

Specialized coatings are easy to apply
and can make your customer’s lives safer.
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By Jerry Rabushka

Palette of Departments

Same mistake again

Good Bye, I'll See You Some More
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By Jerry Rabushka, Editor

Tough. Truck. Tools.

Rust-Oleum Industrial Brands has introduced a new video series called Rust-Oleum Tough. This collection of videos features extreme testing to showcase the durability of the brand’s products.
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By Jerry Rabushka

New products for new projects (or touch up and maintenance).

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By The Paint Contractor


By Jerry Rabushka,

Good Bye, I’ll See You Some More

jerry08
by Jerry Rabushka

I’m not one of those “no fear, no regrets” kind of guys. I find that whole philosophy annoying. Frankly if I’m walking down the street and six hungry tigers are headed my way, I’m afraid. First of all, why are there six big cats on Kirkwood Road, and second of all…well I’m not going to stick around for second of all.

No regrets? I wonder if you’ve lived a life at all. Surely there has to be something you did that you wish you hadn’t, even if it “made you who you are today.” For me there are a couple, one is having said or done things that hurt other people—or would have, had I been caught. If you don’t regret that, I have to wonder who in fact you are? There are things I did 25 years ago I still wonder if I can fix, or make right.

The other is hanging on to relationships a lot longer than I should have. Be they romantic, professional, artistic, or friendship, more often than not I should have walked away from people rather than stuck around trying to “make it right.” Frankly, I’ve allowed people to abuse me far too long vs. saying “you’ve gotta go.” Sometimes you say “good bye,” and darned if they’re not right back with an apology and another chance to do the same thing they already did.

I’ve had to walk away from people who helped me get started in theater, from people who contributed to my band, even some close friends who kept, over time, repeating the same destructive behaviors. How many times can someone say “I’m sorry?” before it just doesn’t mean anything. To me an apology is something you did wrong that you know is wrong and promise not to do again. And forgiveness does not imply a license to repeat.

The other problem is this—by giving in to someone’s bad behavior, I had actually hurt someone else in the process. You’re forcing everyone else to put up with BS that they shouldn’t have to, and that’s on you, not the person doing it. But had I not, and often too late for praying, walked away from some people, I’d have no band, no theater, no friends, and perhaps no love.

In business it’s harder, because often there’s “food on the table” or pride or some other etiqutte we need to follow. What happens when you bring a close friend into your business and find out that it’s not working out? You give that friend chance after chance, but you eventually realize you, your crew and all their families will suffer if you don’t take action. Finally it’s not on the friend, but it’s on you—you are in fact the person looked down on because you favored the problem person over the people doing a good job, and everyone paid for it.

It comes down to this: whether it’s a fun activity, a job, or even a friendship, sometimes you have to fire people. Since these people are often combative and obnoxious, you’ll be tempted to put it off even further because you don’t want the blowback. Accusations, slammed doors, nasty Facebook posts, you name it. But after that, life calms down. Take care of yourself, and take care of the people that take care of you. Just take care.

I regret sincerely not having done this soon enough. On the other hand, I gave everyone every chance. Don’t act too soon, don’t act too late. It’s a balancing act. The same guy who wrote the hit song “Ballin’ The Jack” in 1913 also wrote one called “Good Bye, I’ll See You Some More,” where the singer says “This time I really mean it!”

But we all know better. Splat-TPC


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Publisher/President
Hans Mugler
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Associate Publisher/Editor
Jerry Rabushka
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Kathryn Tongay-Carr
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Shirley Schomaker
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Gail Hern
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Sue Oden
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Melissa Biegener
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Hans Mugler
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Ph: (314) 984-0800
Cell: (314) 616-9080
Fax: (314) 984-0866